BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Provide the following information for the key personnel in the order listed for Form Page 2.

Follow the sample format for each person. DO NOT EXCEED FOUR PAGES.

 

NAME:  Michael S. Hughes

 

 

POSITION TITLE:  Assistant Research Professor of Medicine

 

EDUCATION/TRAINING  (Begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education, such as nursing, and include postdoctoral training.)

INSTITUTION AND LOCATION

DEGREE

(if applicable)

YEAR(s)

FIELD OF STUDY

Washington University in St. Louis, MO

B.A.

1980

Physics/Mathematics

Washington University in St. Louis, MO

M.S.

1982

Physics

Washington University in St. Louis, MO

Ph.D.

1987

Physics

 

NOTE: The Biographical Sketch may not exceed four pages. Items A and B (together) may not exceed two of the four-page limit.  Follow the formats and instructions on the attached sample.

 

A.      Positions and Honors.

1988-1991: Associate Research Physicist; Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

1991-1992: Research Physicist; Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

1992-1994: Senior Research Physicist; Mallinckrodt Inc., St. Louis, Missouri

1994-2000: Research Associate; Mallinckrodt Inc., St. Louis, Missouri

2000-present: Research Associate Professor Of Medicine

 

NASA Graduate Research Fellow, 1985-1988

B.     Selected peer-reviewed publications (in chronological order).

 1. M.S. Hughes, "A Comparison of Entropy vs. Total Energy Analysis of Ultrasonic Waves in Plexiglas with Flaws," J. Acoust. Soc. Amer. 91(4),Pt. 1, April 1992, pp. 2272-2275.

 2. M.S. Hughes, "Analysis of Ultrasonic Waveforms Using Shannon Entropy," IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, Vol. 92CH3118-7, pp. 1205-1209, 1992.

 3. M.S. Hughes, "Analysis of Digitized Waveforms Using Shannon Entropy," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 91(4), February 1993, pp. 892-906.

 4. M.S. Hughes, "Analysis of digitized waveforms using Shannon entropy. II. High-speed Algorithms based on Green’s functions," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 95(5), May 1994, pp.2582-2588.

 5. M.S. Hughes, "NDE Imaging of Flaws Using Rapid Computation of Shannon Entropy," IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, Vol. 93CH3301-9, pp. 697-700, 1993.

 6. C.S. Hall, J.N. Marsh, M.S. Hughes, J. Mobley, K.D. Wallace, J.G. Miller, and G.H. Brandenburger, “Broadband Measurement of the Backscatter Coefficient for Suspensions: A Potential Calibration Tool,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 101, pp. 1162-1171, 1997.

 7. N. Marsh, C.S. Hall, M.S. Hughes, J. Mobley, J.G. Miller, and G.H. Brandenburger, “Broadband Through-Transmission Signal Loss Measurements of Albunex Suspensions at Concentrations Approaching In Vivo Doses,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 101, pp. 1155-1161, 1977.

 8. A.L. Klibanov, M.S. Hughes, J.N. Marsh, C.S. Hall, J.G. Miller, J.H. Wible G.H. Brandenburger “Targeting Of Ultrasound Contrast Material: An In Vitro Feasibility Study,” Acta Radiologica, 38, Supplement 412, pp. 113-120, 1997.

 9. J. Mobley, J. N. Marsh, C. S. Hall, M.S. Hughes, G. H. Brandenburger, James G. Miller, "Broadband measurements of phase velocity in Albunex suspensions," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 103(4), April 1998, pp.2145-2153.

 10. J.N. Marsh, M.S. Hughes, C.S. Hall, S.H. Lewis, R.L. Trousil, G.H. Brandenburger, H. Levene, J.G. Miller, "Frequency and concentration dependence of backscatter coefficient of the ultrasound contrast agent Albunex," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 104(3), September 1998, pp.1654-1666.

 11. A.L. Klibanov, K.W. Ferrara, M.S. Hughes, J.H. Wible, J.K. Wojdyla, P.A. Dayton, K.E. Morgan, and G.H. Brandenburger, “Direct Video-Microscopic Observation of the Dynamic Effects of Medical Ultrasound on Ultrasound Contrast Microspheres,” Investigative Radiology, 33(12), 1998, pp. 863-869.

12. A.L. Klibanov, M.S. Hughes, J.K. Wojdyla, J.N. Marsh, C.S. Hall, J.G. Miller, J.H. Wible, and G.H. Brandenburger, "Targeting of ultrasound contrast material: Selective imaging of microbubbles in vitro," Academic Radiology, 5, S243-S246 (1998).

13. J. Mobley, K.R. Waters, C.S. Hall, J.N. Marsh, M.S. Hughes, G.H. Brandenburger, J.G. Miller, "Measurements and predictions of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient in suspensions of elastic microspheres," J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 106(2), 1999, pp. 652-659.

14. K.R. Waters, M.S. Hughes, J. Mobley, G.H. Brandenburger, J.G. Miller," On the applicability of Kramers-Krönig relations for ultrasonic attenuation obeying a frequency power law," Accepted by JASA.

15. M.S. Hughes, J.N. Marsh, A.L. Klibanov, G.H. Brandenburger, J.G. Miller, "A Device for Measurement of Attenuation Coefficient and Phase Velocity of Nearly Pure Ultrasonic Contrast Agents," IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1999.

16. J.N. Marsh, M.S. Hughes, G.H Brandenburger, J.G. Miller, "Broadband Measurement of the Scattering-to-Attenuation Ratio for Albunex at 37°C," Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, 25 (8), pp. 1321-1324, 1999.

17. J.H. Wible, J.K. Wojdyla, M.S. Hughes, G.H. Brandenburger, “Effects of Transducer Frequency and Output Power on the Ultrasonographic Contrast Produced by Optison Using Fundamental and Harmonic Imaging Techniques,” J. Ultrasound in Medicine, 18, pp. 753-762, 1999.

18. A.L. Klibanov, M.S. Hughes, F.S. Villanueva, R.J. Jankowski, W.R. Wagner, J.K. Wojdyla, J.H. Wible, G.H. Brandenburger, “Targeting and ultrasound imaging of microbubble-based contrast agents,” MAGMA Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine, 8, pp. 177-184, 1999.

19. K.R. Waters, M.S. Hughes, G.H. Brandenburger, J.G. Miller, “Kramers-Krönig Dispersion Relations for Ultrasonic Attenuation Obeying a Frequency Power Law,” IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, Vol. 99, 1999.

20. J.H. Wible, J.K. Wojdyla, M.S. Hughes, and G.H. Brandenburger, "Effects of transducer frequency and output power on the ultrasonographic contrast produced by Optison using fundamental and harmonic imaging techniques," Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, 18(11), 753-762 (1999).

21. M.S. Hughes, A.L. Klibanov, J.N. Marsh, J.G. Miller, “Broadband time-domain reflectometry measurement of attenuation and phase velocity in highly attenuating suspensions with application to the ultrasound contrast medium Albunex ®,” Journal of the Acoustical Socieyt of America, 108 (2), pp. 813-820, 2000.

22. K.R. Waters, M.S. Hughes, J. Mobley, G.H. Brandenburger, J.G. Miller, “On the applicability of Kramers-Kronig relations for ultrasonic attenuation obeying a frequency power law,” Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 108 (2), pp. 556-563, 2000.

23. K.R. Waters, M.S. Hughes, G.H. Brandenburger, J.G. Miller, “On a time-domain representation of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations,” Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 108 (5), pp 2114-2119, Part I, 2000.

24.A.L. Klibanov, M.S. Hughes, J.N. Marsh, C.S. Hall, J.G. Miller, G.H. Brandenburger, “Targeting Of Ultrasound Contrast Material: Selective Imaging Of Microbubbles In Vitro,” Presented at the 1997 CMR in Japan.

25. A.L. Klibanov, M.S. Hughes, J.N. Marsh, C.S. Hall, J.G. Miller, G.H. Brandenburger, “Targeting of Microbubbles: Selective In Vitro Binding to Solid Surfaces and Scattering of Ultrasound”, presented at the 1997 UCMRR meeting in San Diego.

26. J.N. Marsh, C.S. Hall, M.S. Hughes, J. Mobley, G.H. Brandenburger, J.G. Miller, “Broadband In Vitro Measurements, and Velocity and Material Properties of Albunex,” presented at the 1997 UCMRR meeting in San Diego.

27. A.L. Klibanov, M.S. Hughes, J.K. Wojdyla, J.H. Wible, and G.H. Brandenburger, "Destruction of contrast agent microbubbles in the ultrasound field: The fate of the microbubble shell and the importance of the bubble gas content," Academic Radiology, 9, S41-S45 (2002).

28. A.L. Klibanov, P.T. Rasche, M.S. Hughes, J.K. Wojdyla, K.P. Galen, J.H. Wible, and G.H. Brandenburger, "Detection of individual microbubbles of an ultrasound contrast agent: Fundamental and pulse inversion imaging," Academic Radiology, 9, S279-S281 (2002).

29. J.H. Wible, K.P. Galen, J.K. Wojdyla, M.S. Hughes, A.L. Klibanov, and G.H. Brandenburger, "Microbubbles induce renal hemorrhage when exposed to diagnostic ultrasound in anesthetized rats," Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, 28(11-12), 1535-1546 (2002).

30. A.L. Klibanov, P.T. Rasche, M.S. Hughes, J.K. Wojdyla, K.P. Galen, J.H. Wible, and G.H. Brandenburger, "Detection of individual microbubbles of ultrasound contrast agents - Imaging of free-floating and targeted bubbles," Investigative Radiology, 39(3), 187-195 (2004).

31. M.S. Hughes, J. N. Marsh, C.S. Hall, R.W. Fuhrhop, E.K. Lacy, G.M. Lanza, S.A. Wickline, “Acoustic Characterization in Whole Blood and Plasma of Site-Targeted Nanoparticle Ultrasound Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging,” Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 117 (2), pp 964-972.

32. Hughes, M.S., et al., Characterization of Digital Waveforms Using Thermodynamic Analogs: Applications to Detection of Materials Defects. I.E.E.E Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, 2005.


C.  Research Support.

 

Hughes M.S.

 

ONGOING

RO1 HL42950-15 Wickline (PI)                                                          08/01/95-07/31/06

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Ultrasonic Tissue Characterization of Cardiac Remodeling.

The major goals of quantitative ultrasonic tissue characterization of cardiac remodeling are: 1) to elucidate architectural alterations in myocardium that result from cardiomyopathy, infarction, and hypertension, 2) to delineate improvement in tissue remodeling after therapy with ACE inhibitors, and 3) to mathematically model the physical determinants of ultrasonic scattering from myocardium and predict mechanical properties of myocardial tissue.

Role: Co-Investigator

 

R01 HL59865-04 (Hughes)                                                                 12/19/97-6/30/06

NIH/NHLBI

Specific Tissue Targeted Ultrasonic Contrast Agent.

The proposal aims to: 1) characterize nanoparticle binding and contrast enhancement effects for ultrasound imaging; 2) characterize clinically important features of atherosclerosis with targeted ultrasound molecular imaging; and 3) optimize nanoparticle formulation for clinical testing. The clinical impact of this technology is expected to encompass early noninvasive detection of pathologies such as atherosclerosis, convenient longitudinal outpatient evaluation, and site-targeted delivery of therapeutics as clinically indicated.

Role:  PI

 

Grant-In-Aid 0355474Z (Hughes)                                                        7/1/03 to 6/30/05

American Heart Association-Heartland Affiliate

Cardiac imaging via information-theoretic signal receivers of backscatter from targeted nanoparticle emulsions.

The goal of this project is to twofold.  The first goal is to delineate the bounds of linear behavior of liquid perfluorocarbon nanoparticles as acoustic scatterers by establishing quantitative threshold levels for incident acoustic pressure at which nonlinearities in attenuation become evident, and to determine the ambient temperature, acoustic power, concentration, and waveform shape required to phase-convert at least one perfluorocarbon nanoparticle into a gas microbubble in order to establish upper bounds on conditions required to convert perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) nanoparticles to gas microbubbles and evaluate relevance to in vivo conditions, if any. The second objective is to investigate thermodynamic signal processing to assess sensitivity improvements achieved by these receivers when used in conjunction with targeted nanoparticle emulsions, by investigating, in vitro, backscatter from suspensions of targeted emulsion maintained in a mixed state while suspended in either saline or blood and to measure, in vitro, backscatter from a thin layer of targeted emulsion adhering to thin layers of cardiac tissue.  A quantitative comparison of conventional (b-mode integrated backscatter) and thermodynamic techniques will be performed. 

Role:  PI

 

N01-CO-37007 Lanza (PI)                                                                  09/30/03-09/29/06      

National Cancer Institute                                            

Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Solid Tumors with a Novel anb3-Directed

Nanoparticle Targeted to the Neovasculature.

The ultimate aims of this contract are to demonstrate the feasibility of this unique, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic technology to detect angiogenesis associated with solid tumors and to deliver local therapy.

Role:  Co-Investigator