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Ultra-tiny 'bees' Target Tumors
8/18/2009
They're ready to sting, and they know where they're going. They're called "nanobees," and they're not insects -- they're tiny particles designed to destroy cancer cells by delivering a synthesized version of a toxin called melittin that is found in bees.
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Nano-sized technology has super-sized effect on tumors
4/2/2008
Anyone facing chemotherapy would welcome an advance promising to dramatically reduce their dose of these often harsh drugs. Using nanotechnology, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have taken a step closer to that goal.
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Academic Cross-Training in Nanomedicine
10/31/2007
Nanotechnology offers new possibilities for dealing with old problems in diagnosing, treating, and preventing cancer. To realize this potential, scientists from disparate fields are collaborating on wide-ranging projects, bringing their different skills and mindsets to the table. Research teams comprising engineers, chemists, biologists, surgeons, and pathologists are becoming the norm in the cancer nanotechnology world, in large part because of prompting and encouragement from the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.
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Targeted Nanoparticles Image Early Tumors
3/10/2007
A well-established fact in cancer therapy is that early tumor detection improves the odds that a patient will survive the disease. Now, using nanoparticles targeted to the tiny blood vessels that surround even the smallest tumors, researchers at the Siteman Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE) have developed a radioactive imaging agent that was able to identify human tumors in rabbits. This work appears in the International Journal of Cancer.
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SCC Annual Progress Report
3/15/2007

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Academic Cross-Training in Nanomedicine
2/1/2007
Nanotechnology offers new possibilities for dealing with old problems in diagnosing, treating, and preventing cancer. To realize this potential, scientists from disparate fields are collaborating on wide-ranging projects, bringing their different skills and mindsets to the table. Research teams comprising engineers, chemists, biologists, surgeons, and pathologists are becoming the norm in the cancer nanotechnology world, in large part because of prompting and encouragement from the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.
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Nanotechnology enables low-dose treatment of atherosclerotic plaques
8/11/2006
In laboratory tests, one very low dose of a drug was enough to have an effect on notoriously tenacious artery-clogging plaques. What kind of drug is that potent? It's not so much the drug itself as how it was delivered. Fumagillin — a drug that can inhibit the growth of new blood vessels that feed atherosclerotic plaques — was sent directly to the base of plaques by microscopically small spheres called nanoparticles developed by School of Medicine researchers.
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$16 Million National Cancer Institute Award Advancing Nanomedicine Research in Cancer
10/3/2005
Nano-sized particles developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis offer hope of replacing numerous medical tests, scans, or surgeries with a simple injection. The tiny spheres can travel through the bloodstream deep into the body to locate and highlight tumors undetectable by typical methods. While at the tumor site, the nanoparticles can deliver therapeutic agents to destroy the tumor. To advance this promising technology, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded $16 million over five years to the School of Medicine to establish the Siteman Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (SCCNE). The NCI also awarded funding for six other Centers of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNEs) around the United States.
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Ground broken for new building to spur biotechnology in St. Louis
12/16/2004
Efforts to develop a significant biotechnology industry in St. Louis got a major boost with the groundbreaking for a new laboratory and office building that will provide space for growing companies.
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U.S. cancer institute starts nanotechnology drive
9/14/2004
The U.S. National Cancer Institute announced a new five-year plan on Monday, Sept. 13, to develop the use of tiny tools to fight cancer, saying nanotechnology just might provide the edge needed to defeat the disease.
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